Pier 57

Ten Awards Highlight Individuals and Projects that have Contributed to the Preservation and Adaptive Reuse of Historic Places 

Governor Kathy Hochul today announced that nine projects and one individual are being recognized with 2022 New York State Historic Preservation Awards. Projects highlighted with this year’s awards include a community-led establishment of a historic district in Chautauqua County, transformational design of historic garden space in Westchester County, and the completed restoration of a historic pier in New York City. 

“Preserving notable landmarks across New York allows us to celebrate our shared history and honor our collective past,” Governor Hochul said. “I congratulate this year’s recipients on their efforts to capitalize on our historic and cultural resources to build a brighter future for our state.” 

Created in 1980, the State Historic Preservation Awards are presented by the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation each year to honor excellence in the protection and revitalization of historic and cultural resources. 

New York State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid said, “Historic preservation is collaborative work and we welcome the opportunity to recognize projects that harness the energy and demonstrate the remarkable potential of historic preservation. We are proud to be an active partner on projects throughout New York State and congratulate all of the individuals and groups who make preservation possible. Their extraordinary efforts and creative visions are inspirational and have positive, long-lasting effects in our communities.” 

This year’s 2022 State Historic Preservation Awards recipients are: 

Cynthia Howk
Outstanding Contributions to Historic Preservation 

Cynthia Howk is recognized for Outstanding Contributions to Historic Preservation. Her decades long career and dedication to historic preservation planning, mentorship, and community engagement has had an incalculable impact on the state’s cultural and historic resources. 

East Harlem South/ El Barrio Reconnaissance Level Survey, New York City, New York County
Excellence in Historic Preservation Documentation 

The East Harlem South/ El Barrio Reconnaissance Level Survey is recognized for Excellence in Historic Preservation Documentation. As the first comprehensive historic/cultural resources survey in this part of New York City, the report is an important tool in understanding the built environment and cultural significance of the neighborhood. It will also serve as a model reconnaissance level survey report for other communities statewide. 

F.R. Bain House, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County
Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation 

The F.R. Bain House is recognized for Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation. The project is the culmination of a multi-year effort by homeowner Kimberlee Breden to diligently restore her historic 1888 Queen Anne style home by utilizing the Historic Homeownership Rehabilitation Credit. 

Historic Bridge Rehabilitation Projects, Wayne and Wyoming Counties
Excellence in Historic Preservation Consultation 

Cross-collaborative efforts to thoughtfully and creatively revive historic bridges-specifically the Schoellkopf Road Bridge in Wyoming County and the Quaker/ O’Neil Road Bridge over the Erie Canal in Macedon, Wayne County-are recognized with theExcellence in Historic Preservation Consultation award. 

Jay Estate Gardens, Jay Heritage Center, Rye, Westchester County
Excellence in Nonprofit Achievement 

The Jay Estate Gardens at the Jay Heritage Center is recognized for Excellence in Nonprofit Achievement. The transformational design of the gardens not only reflects the historic context, but emphasizes an intentionality to restore native species and original voices and to cultivate an appreciation and understanding of sustainable landscapes through partnerships and public outreach. 

Lily Dale Assembly Historic District, Lily Dale, Chautauqua County
Excellence in Community Achievement 
Lily Dale Assembly Historic District is recognized for Excellence in Community Achievement. The effort to nominate this community for its historic contributions to Spiritualism and the women’s rights movement was spearheaded by community members whose advocacy and persistence successfully identified more than 200 historic resources for the district, which is now listed on the National and State Registers of Historic Places. 

Niagara River Gorge Access Stairway Rehabilitation Projects, Niagara Falls, Niagara County
Excellence in OPRHP Project Achievement 
The Niagara River Gorge Access Stairway Rehabilitation Projects at Devil’s Hole and Whirlpool State Parks is recognized for Excellence in OPRHP (Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation) Achievement. The projects blended historic preservation with utility and respected the historic stone stair design while prioritizing safety improvements. 

Old Snell Hall, Potsdam, St. Lawrence County
Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation 
Old Snell Hall is recognized for Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation for a highly visible reinvestment project in the heart of Potsdam that adopted a successful historic preservation model and breathed life into an underutilized community resource by transforming it into a new mixed-use space. 

Pier 57, New York City, New York County
Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation 
Pier 57 is recognized for Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation. This adaptive reuse project of a historic pier in New York City is a unique first example of preservation work for a structure type that is iconic to the city’s history. The pioneering vision, made possible through New York State and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits, now blends innovative construction technology from the 1950s with a cohesive contemporary design. 

T Building, Queens, Queens County
Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation 
The T Building is recognized for Excellence in Historic Building Rehabilitation. In addition to creating much needed supportive housing and space for local community services this adaptive reuse project, which was made possible through New York State and federal historic rehabilitation tax credits, restored many of the building’s original Art Moderne-style features and is a remarkable illustration of revitalized architecture. 

The mission of the New York State Division for Historic Preservation (DHP) is to create meaningful connections to the dynamic history of the state for all residents and visitors and the Division is committed to protecting historic and cultural resources. Part of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, the DHP strives to raise awareness of the value of historic places for future generations and to expand the complex narratives in order to tell a more complete story that represents the diversity of the state’s people, both past and present. Learn more about the full scope of the Division’s work online.