Mayor Adams, NYCEDC, NYCDOT, Manhattan Borough President, and Hudson Square BID cut the ribbon on completed improvements to Hudson Street

Streetscape and Street Safety Improvements Include Widened Sidewalks, Parking-Protected Bike Lanes, Unique Green Space

Transformation Marks Completion of BID’s 10-Year Master Plan to Turn a “Place for Cars” Into a “Place for People”

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Hudson Square Business Improvement District (BID) today unveiled the newly renovated Hudson Street streetscape. The streetscape, located on Hudson Street between Canal and West Houston Streets, features new green space, parking-protected bike lanes, widened sidewalks, lush plantings, and modern pedestrian amenities. The $13 million streetscape — completed with an 87-percent overall minority- and women-owned business enterprise (M/WBE) participation rate — was the first infrastructure project in New York City to utilize the design-build process, which allows projects to be completed more quickly and efficiently.

“With this partnership, our city and our community are working together to make New York City safer, cleaner, and greener,” said Mayor Adams. “This project has transformed Hudson Street into a model of urban design — securing roadway space for cyclists, enhancing the pedestrian environment, and unlocking public space. We are taking the dream of a livable and sustainable city and turning it into reality, making major investments in safety on our streets and in the quality of life that draws so many people to live and work in New York City. That’s what we call ‘Getting Stuff Done.’”

“NYCEDC is proud to have managed the city’s first design-build project to transform Hudson Street into a beautiful corridor for New Yorkers to gather and cyclists to travel safely,” said NYCEDC President and CEO Andrew Kimball. “This project delivers on the mayor’s vision to create more open space and improve public safety. We thank DOT, Hudson Square BID, and the developers for their partnership.”

“We are proud to have worked with the EDC and the Hudson Square BID to deliver critical improvements that beautify Hudson Street while also supporting businesses and safe, efficient travel options,” said DOT Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez. “This administration is committed to working alongside the private sector to improve how we deliver projects like these, and we appreciate the support and vision from the Hudson Square BID.”

“The beautiful renovations along Hudson Street showcase the BID’s continued efforts to create an attractive, safe, and inviting experience for people who work, visit, and live in Hudson Square,” said Hudson Square BID President and CEO Samara Karasyk. “We’ve transformed our neighborhood from a place known for its car congestion near the Holland Tunnel into a vibrant and welcoming neighborhood for pedestrians, filled with creative energy. The completion of this project marks a new beginning as we commence our next 10-year plan with a new slate of projects that highlight our fantastic neighborhood and build upon our rich past.”

Additional improvements include:

  • A dedicated, parking-protected bike lane;
  • 70 new bike parking spaces;
  • Over 8,000 square feet of newly planted areas filled with various trees, shrubs, and perennials;
  • New, modern benches providing approximately 170 additional seats; and
  • Over 2,000 square feet for sidewalk cafes.

“A decade ago, this stretch of Manhattan was synonymous with Holland Tunnel congestion. Now, thanks to the Hudson Square BID’s tireless work, Hudson Street is a place people actually enjoy,” said Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine. “This streetscape is a model for how neighborhoods can become more vibrant and welcoming to pedestrians, cyclists, and local businesses. I look forward to working with the BID on their next 10-year plan to continue making Hudson Square safer and more beautiful.”

“The future of New York City public space prioritizes people over cars, and I’m so proud that we have done that along Hudson Street,” said New York City Council Member Erik Bottcher. “Widened sidewalks, protected bike lanes, and more greenery will make this section of our district an attractive destination. Thank you NYCEDC, NYC DOT, and the Hudson Square BID for working together to make these exciting improvements a reality.”

“Many residents have reached out to CB2 to share how impressed they are with the improved streetscape, plantings, and, in particular, the protected bike lane that now connects Hudson Square to the West Village,” said Manhattan Community Board 2 (CB2) Chair Jeannine Kiely. We are thrilled with the green, clean, and safe renovations on Hudson Street, and we look forward to working with the BID, NYCEDC, NYC DOT, and the local community on implementation of the next 10-year plan.”

The Hudson Street Streetscape is part of the BID’s first 10-year master plan and marks its completion. The BID now begins its next 10-year plan, Hudson Square: New Connections. The plan will reinforce Hudson Square as part of the Lower Manhattan ecosystem, with new projects focused on neighborhood connections to Tribeca, East Houston Street, and Hudson River Park, with reimagined sidewalks and curb spaces that prioritize pedestrians and cyclists.

About NYCEDC
New York City Economic Development Corporation is a mission-driven, nonprofit organization that creates shared prosperity across New York City by strengthening neighborhoods and creating good jobs. We work with and for communities to bring emerging industries to New York City; develop spaces and facilities for businesses; empower New Yorkers through training and skill-building; and invest in sustainable and innovative projects that make the city a great place to live and work. To learn more about what we do, visit us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn, and Instagram.

About NYC DOT
NYC DOT’s mission is to provide for the safe, efficient, and environmentally responsible movement of people and goods, and to maintain and enhance the transportation infrastructure crucial to the economic vitality and quality of life of New York City residents. More than 5,000 DOT employees oversee one of the most complex urban transportation networks in the world, managing 6,000 miles of streets and highways, 12,000 miles of sidewalk, and 794 bridges and tunnels, including the iconic East River bridges. Our staff also installs and maintains more than one million street signs, 12,000 signalized intersections, 315,000 street lights, and 200 million linear feet of street markings. DOT promotes the use of sustainable modes of transportation, designing bicycle facilities, bus lanes, and public plazas. DOT also operates the Staten Island Ferry, which serves over 22 million people annually.

About Hudson Square
Since its formation in 2009, the Hudson Square Business Improvement District (BID) has overseen the transformation of Manhattan’s former Printing District into a 21st century creative hub with redeveloped streetscapes, inviting green spaces, abundant public art, vibrant retail and dining, and a growing residential community. The area the BID manages is generally bounded by Clarkson Street on the north, Canal Street on the south, 6th Avenue on the east, and West Street on the west. The BID’s signature programs include neighborhood maintenance; marketing; Pedestrian Safety Managers; the award-winning Hudson Square Standard urban forestry program; the Hudson Square Canvas public art initiative; and the nationally recognized Hudson Square Is Now streetscape program, a $27 million public-private partnership with the City of New York. The BID’s new neighborhood plan, Hudson Square: New Connections, builds on lessons learned about open space, mobility, and community to envision new ways of fostering the physical, social, and cultural connections of a community where the spirit of innovation flourishes. For more information, visit hudsonsquarebid.org.