Artists perform at Teen Night: Essence/Imprint, a teen-led evening of art and activism, 2019. Brooklyn Museum. (Photo: Kolin Mendez Photography)

Virtual and in-person programming welcomes community members to the Museum

The Brooklyn Museum presents a robust lineup of programming for adults and children this winter, including the return of in-person Teen Nights and intimate studio art classes inspired by special exhibitions Andy Warhol: Revelation and Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams. Other programs include talks, classes, tours, and special events that amplify the Museum’s exhibitions and collection, serve its surrounding community, and support learning through the visual arts.

All visitors to the Museum’s in-person programs who are 5 and older must show proof of vaccination and a valid I.D. Masks are required, regardless of vaccination status, for all adults and children over the age of 2, in accordance with procedures and guidelines laid out by the CDC and local health officials. Some programs will take place online and through the Museum’s social media channels.

Museum Members enjoy complimentary or discounted tickets and early access to public programs.

The full schedule is as follows:

Virtual We Speak Art
Thursday, February 3, 6–7 pm

Online
Free, reserve tickets in advance.

Join fellow English language learners and practice your conversational English skills with a discussion inspired by a work of art. All levels of English proficiency are welcome.

Studio Art: Printmaking Inspired by Andy Warhol
Saturday, February 5, 1–5 pm

Education Gallery, 1st Floor
Tickets are $125 and include admission to Andy Warhol: Revelation.

Create your own prints in this intimate studio art class, inspired by the special exhibition Andy Warhol: Revelation and focused on the artist’s innovative printmaking techniques. The workshop begins with a walkthrough of Revelation, where co-curator Carmen Hermo will discuss how Warhol’s creative process was influenced by his Catholic faith, immigrant family upbringing, and queer identity. Then, participants will head into the studios for an intensive workshop led by members of Shoestring Press, a community printmaking studio based in Crown Heights.

Hablemos de Arte
Thursday, February 10, 6:30–7:30 pm

Meet in the Rubin Lobby, 1st Floor
Free, reserve tickets in advance.

Join an informal conversation inspired by a work of art and practice your Spanish by exchanging ideas with other participants. All levels of Spanish proficiency are welcome.

Brooklyn Talks: White Shoes with Nona Faustine
Friday, February 11, 7–9 pm

Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor
Tickets are $16 and include after-hours access to The Slipstream: Reflection, Resistance, and Resilience in the Art of Our Time.

Artist Nona Faustine discusses her new book White Shoes in a conversation with book contributors Jessica Lanay, Pamela Sneed, and Seph Rodney. White Shoes is a collection of self-portraits taken in locations around New York that were formerly the sites of slave auctions, burial grounds, slave-owning farms, and the coastal locations where slave ships docked. Faustine’s book confronts the city’s once significant—and now largely obscured and unacknowledged— involvement in the slave trade, in solidarity with the people whose names and memories have been lost but are embedded in the land. The conversation will be followed by a book signing.

Studio Art: Couture Crowns Inspired by Dior
Saturday, February 12, 1–5 pm

Education Gallery, 1st Floor
Tickets are $125 and include admission to Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams.

Examine cutting-edge hat designs in this intimate studio art class, inspired by Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams and led by contemporary textile artists Ọmọlará Williams McCallister and Maya Valladares. Participants will visit the exhibition galleries to study creations from the House of Dior and renowned milliner Stephen Jones—alongside diverse stitching, shaping, and historical millinery traditions found throughout the Museum—then apply their new knowledge by creating a handmade headpiece.

Salsa Party
Thursday, February 17, 6–9:30 pm

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor
Free, reserve tickets in advance.

Salsa season continues with social dancing and performances by Balmir Dance Society. The evening starts with a class led by professional dancers at 6 pm, then the dance floor opens up with live music and performances by Brooklyn’s best Latin dance teams.

Brooklyn Reads: Bitter with Akwaeke Emezi
Thursday, February 17, 7–9 pm

Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor
Tickets are $25 and include a copy of Bitter.

Akwaeke Emezi launches Bitter, their latest novel, which explores the stakes of social revolution and how youth lead the way, with a reading and conversation with author Nic Stone. The companion novel to Pet a 2019 finalist for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature—Bitter follows a young artist torn between staying within the walls of her studio or protesting in the streets against the deep injustices that grip her hometown of Lucille. The program is followed by a book signing, and attendees may enjoy an after-hours viewing of The Slipstream: Reflection, Resistance, and Resilience in the Art of Our Times.

Teen Night: Feminism in Fashion
Friday, February 18, 5–7:30 pm

Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor
Free, reserve tickets in advance. Open to all youth ages 14–22.

The Museum celebrates the in-person return of Teen Nights, its teen-led program centered on art and activism. February’s program highlights a range of art-making, performances, and other activities inspired by Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams. Follow #bkmteens on Instagram or Facebook to learn more.

Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra: Glinka, Gurria-Cárdenas, Brahms
Sunday, February 20, 6–7:30 pm

Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor
Advance tickets are $20; same-day tickets are $25 at the door; free for youth 16 and under.

The Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra welcomes Associate Conductor Felipe Tristan to lead an exciting program featuring Mikhael Glinka’s “Ruslan and Ludmila”; the premiere of “Malintzin,” a new commission by Latinx composer José Gurria-Cárdenas; and Johannes Brahms’s Fourth Symphony.