Photos: (Left) Barack Obama by Kehinde Wiley, 2018, oil on canvas, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, © 2018 Kehinde Wiley; Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama by Amy Sherald, 2018, oil on linen, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. The National Portrait Gallery is grateful to the generous donors who made these commissions possible and proudly recognizes them at npg.si.edu/obamaportraitstour; (Center) Facsimile of genealogy of the House of Moctezuma, 1791, 2021 facsimile of the original in the collection of the Archivo General de la Nación by Tlaoli Ramírez Téllez, courtesy of the artist, commissioned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, © Tlaoli Ramírez Téllez; (Right) Still from the film Exposition Universelle 1900, Gaumont, 1900. Document GP Archives, Collection Gaumont

Current as of October 2021. Information is subject to change. For a listing of all exhibitions and installations, please visit www.lacma.org.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

The Obama Portraits Tour
November 7, 2021–January 2, 2022

From the moment of their unveiling at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in February 2018, the museum’s official portraits of President Barack Obama and Mrs. Michelle Obama have become iconic. Kehinde Wiley’s portrait of President Obama and Amy Sherald’s portrait of the former First Lady have inspired unprecedented responses from the public. This five-city tour will travel to the Art Institute of Chicago, Brooklyn Museum, LACMA, High Art Museum, and The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston from June 2021 through May 2022 and is expected to reach millions of people who might not otherwise have an opportunity to view these remarkable paintings. In addition to the artworks themselves, the LACMA presentation of The Obama Portraits Tour will feature teacher workshops, curatorial tours, and a richly illustrated book. This special presentation will enhance the conversations surrounding the power of portraiture and its potential to engage communities.
Curators: Christine Y. Kim, Contemporary Art, LACMA; Liz Andrews, Director’s Office, LACMA
Itinerary: Art Institute of Chicago (June 18–August 15, 2021); Brooklyn Museum (August 27–October 24, 2021); High Museum of Art (January 14–March 20, 2022); Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (March 27–April 2, 2022)
Credit: The Obama Portraits Tour is organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Support for the national tour has been generously provided by Bank of America.

In Los Angeles: Presented by Gucci.

Principal sponsorship provided by Snapchat.

Major support provided by Janine Sherman Barrois and Lyndon J. Barrois, Sr.; Ina Coleman; Brickson E. Diamond; The Claire Falkenstein Foundation; Kristen Boggs Jaeger and Jeffrey Jaeger; Jill Lawrence and Paul Koplin in honor of Martha Koplin; Arthur R. Lewis; Janet Dreisen Rappaport; and D’Rita and Robbie Robinson.

Generous support provided by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®; Stanley and Joyce Black Family Foundation; Kimberly A. Blackwell; Lizzie and Steve Blatt; Rebecca and Troy Carter; Ava L. Coleman and Debra L. Lee; Far Western Region, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®; George and Azita Fatheree; Danny First; Foundation for Advancement in Conservation and Tru Vue, Inc.; The Gilford Family; Deon T. Jones; Gail and George Knox; Chrystal and Melvin D. Lindsey; Andrea Nelson Meigs and John Meigs; Issa Rae; Jason and Susan Riffe; Julie and Bennett Roberts, Roberts Projects; V. Joy Simmons, MD; Ryan Tarpley; Treehouse; Abbey Wemimo and Taylor Goodridge; Ric Whitney and Tina Perry-Whitney; and Dr. Francille Rusan Wilson and Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Black American Portraits
November 7, 2021–April 17, 2022

To complement the presentation of The Obama Portraits by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald on tour from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG), LACMA presents Black American Portraits. Remembering Two Centuries of Black American Art, guest curated by David Driskell at LACMA 45 years ago, this exhibition reframes portraiture to center Black American subjects, sitters, and spaces. Spanning over two centuries from c. 1800 to the present day, this selection of approximately 150 works draws primarily from LACMA’s permanent collection and highlights emancipation and early studio photography, scenes from the Harlem Renaissance, portraits from the Civil Rights and Black Power eras, and multiculturalism of the 1990s. Black American Portraits chronicles the ways in which Black Americans have used portraiture to envision themselves in their own eyes. Countering a visual culture that often demonizes Blackness and fetishizes the spectacle of Black pain, these images center love, abundance, family, community, and exuberance.
Curators: Curated by Christine Y. Kim and Liz Andrews with the support of Breanne Bradley.
Credit: This exhibition is organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Presented by Bank of America and Gucci.

Principal sponsorship provided by Snapchat.

Major support provided by Janine Sherman Barrois and Lyndon J. Barrois, Sr.; Ina Coleman; Brickson E. Diamond; The Claire Falkenstein Foundation; Kristen Boggs Jaeger and Jeffrey Jaeger; Jill Lawrence and Paul Koplin in honor of Martha Koplin; Arthur R. Lewis; Janet Dreisen Rappaport; and D’Rita and Robbie Robinson.

Generous support provided by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®; Stanley and Joyce Black Family Foundation; Kimberly A. Blackwell; Lizzie and Steve Blatt; Rebecca and Troy Carter; Ava L. Coleman and Debra L. Lee; Far Western Region, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®; George and Azita Fatheree; Danny First; Foundation for Advancement in Conservation and Tru Vue, Inc.; The Gilford Family; Deon T. Jones; Gail and George Knox; Chrystal and Melvin D. Lindsey; Andrea Nelson Meigs and John Meigs; Issa Rae; Jason and Susan Riffe; Julie and Bennett Roberts, Roberts Projects; V. Joy Simmons, MD; Ryan Tarpley; Treehouse; Abbey Wemimo and Taylor Goodridge; Ric Whitney and Tina Perry-Whitney; and Dr. Francille Rusan Wilson and Dr. Ernest J. Wilson III.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

In the Now: Gender and Nation in Europe, Selections from the Sir Mark Fehrs Haukohl Photography Collection
November 14, 2021–February 13, 2022

In the Now explores and challenges traditional categories of gender, nation, and photography, featuring works made since 2000 by women artists born or working in Europe. Many artists contend with representations of the body, with individual perspectives on beauty, femininity, objectification, and what it means to be an artist who identifies as a woman today. Though born or based in Europe, these artists may or may not locate their practices geographically or in accordance with nationalistic assumptions around identity. Finally, the wide-ranging material and conceptual approaches testify to the expediting force of technology, which has made photography subject to greater circulation, alteration, and abstraction. Selected from the collection of Sir Mark Fehrs Haukohl—donated to LACMA and the Brooklyn Museum in 2021—the exhibition suggests that women photographers practicing in Europe today are global citizens pointing toward a future in which limiting statements can yield to productive questions.
Curators: Britt Salvesen, Photography, LACMA and Eve Schillo, Photography, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum.

Generous support is provided by The Annenberg Foundation.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Family Album: Dannielle Bowman, Janna Ireland, and Contemporary Works from LACMA
November 19, 2021–June 5, 2022
Charles White Elementary School Gallery | 2401 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90057

Revealing insights about family life and the quotidian in the 21st century, Family Album explores the work of artists of color who examine themselves and history through the visual language of family photographs. The exhibition presents new work by Dannielle Bowman and Janna Ireland among contemporaries including Germane Barnes, Mark Bradford, Micaiah Carter, Tony Cokes, Sandra de la Loza, Mercedes Dorame, Genevieve Gaignard, Leslie Hewitt, Star Montana, and Zora Murff. Featured artists confront the physical, political, and emotional aspects of home. Some artists mine their personal archives, while others challenge the aesthetic conventions of snapshots. Integral to the exhibition is the exploration of community. Design, installation, and video consider the impact of segregation laws in American neighborhoods today. Photography, the medium that simulates seeing, summons sensations of daily life and memories of loved ones.
Curator: Dhyandra Lawson, Photography, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Support for this exhibition was provided by the 2021 Collectors Committee.

Exhibitions and education programs at the Charles White Elementary School Gallery are made possible through the Anna H. Bing Children’s Art Endowment Fund.

Mixpantli: Space, Time, and the Indigenous Origins of Mexico
December 12, 2021–May 1, 2022

LACMA marks the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan (modern-day Mexico City) with Mixpantli: Space, Time, and the Indigenous Origins of Mexico. This exhibition subverts the traditional narrative of conquest by centering the creative resilience of Indigenous artists, mapmakers, and storytellers who forged new futures and made their world anew through artistic practice. Nahua scribes gave the name mixpantli, or “banner of clouds,” to the first omen of the conquest, depicting this omen as both a Mexica battle standard and a Euro-Christian column enveloped in clouds. Mixpantli, then, reflects the bringing together of both Nahua and Christian worldviews, and the efforts of Indigenous peoples to reorient space and time in a new world and era. This show puts early colonial art in conversation with pre-Columbian artifacts to showcase the deeply Indigenous worldviews that shaped early Mexico. A companion exhibition to Mixpantli: Contemporary Echoes.
Curators: Diana Magaloni, Art of the Ancient Americas, LACMA; Alyce de Carteret, Art of the Ancient Americas, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support for LACMA’s Art of the Ancient Americas department is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Gregory Annenberg Weingarten, GRoW @ Annenberg.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Mixpantli: Contemporary Echoes
December 12, 2021–June 12, 2022

Mixpantli: Contemporary Echoes showcases the lasting impact of Indigenous creative resilience, connecting the vibrant artistic traditions of the past and the present, of Los Angeles and Mexico. This exhibition features the works of contemporary artists and mapmakers who draw on Indigenous cartographic and artistic histories to challenge dominant narratives about place and belonging. Artworks include Mariana Castillo Deball’s Vista de Ojos (2014), a wooden pavement etched with the oldest map of Mexico City as originally illustrated by a tlacuilo (Indigenous mapmaker); a series of maps by Sandy Rodriguez, who paints with traditional pigments on amate paper to explore the intersection of social memory and contemporary politics; and an interactive map of the Indigenous communities of Los Angeles, produced by Comunidades Indígenas en Liderazgo (CIELO). A companion exhibition to Mixpantli: Space, Time, and the Indigenous Origins of Mexico.
Curator: Diana Magaloni, Art of the Ancient Americas, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support for LACMA’s Art of the Ancient Americas department is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Gregory Annenberg Weingarten, GRoW @ Annenberg.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

City of Cinema: Paris 1850–1907
February 20–July 10, 2022

Placing cinema in the context of 19th-century Parisian visual culture, City of Cinema: Paris 1850–1907 explores how film emerged amid a wave of social, political, artistic, and technological developments. The exhibition brings together paintings, sculpture, posters, prints, photography, and film to reflect the range of artistic experiments that culminated in cinema as a mass medium. The story begins on the streets of Paris, where a diverse populace formed a collective audience for visual spectacle. The exhibition proceeds to domestic and theatrical sites of entertainment, where sociable viewing took place. Moving to local and global sites of production, City of Cinema considers how individuals drew upon technology and fine arts to explore the new medium’s potential. Culminating with a purpose-built Salle du Cinema (movie theater), City of Cinema reveals how citizens became spectators, and how film evolved from novel entertainment to the greatest art form of the 20th century.
Curators: Leah Lehmbeck, European Painting & Sculpture and American Art, LACMA and Britt Salvesen, Photography, LACMA
Itinerary: Musée d’Orsay (September 28, 2021–January 16, 2022)
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles and the musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, Paris.

Generous support is provided by The Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation. Additional support is provided by Gallery 19C.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Barbara Kruger: Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You.
March 20–July 17, 2022

Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You. is a major exhibition devoted to the work of Barbara Kruger, one of the most significant and visible artists of our time. Spanning four decades, this exhibition is the largest and most comprehensive presentation of Kruger’s work in 20 years; it spans her single-channel videos from the 1980s to digital productions of the last two decades, and includes large-scale vinyl room wraps, multichannel video installations, and audio soundscapes throughout LACMA’s campus. As an active consumer and vigilant viewer of popular culture, Kruger grapples with the accelerated ways pictures and words instantaneously flow through media. How they are simultaneously played and re-played informs her most recent video works, which are an exhibition highlight. Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You. is a visually compelling gathering of groundbreaking artwork that is resonant, courageous, and crucial.
Curator: Rebecca Morse, Photography, LACMA
Itinerary: Art Institute of Chicago (September 19, 2021–January 24, 2022); Museum of Modern Art, New York (July 18, 2022 January 2, 2023)
Credit: The exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Presented by Hyundai

Additional support is provided by the Pasadena Art Alliance.

This exhibition is part of The Hyundai Project at LACMA, a joint initiative between Hyundai Motor Company and LACMA since 2015.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Lee Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse
April 24–September 25, 2022
April 24–October 9, 2022

One of the most significant contributors to fashion between 1990 and 2010, Lee Alexander McQueen (London, 1969–2010) was both a conceptual and technical virtuoso. His critically acclaimed collections synthesized the designer’s proficiency in tailoring and dressmaking with both encyclopedic and autobiographical references that spanned time, geography, media, and technology. The first McQueen exhibition on the West Coast, Lee Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse contextualizes the designer’s imaginative work within a canon of artmakers who drew upon analogous themes and visual references. Exploring imagination, artistic process, and innovation in fashion and art, the exhibition examines the interdisciplinary impulse that defined the designer’s career. Displaying select McQueen garments from the Collection of Regina J. Drucker alongside artworks largely from LACMA’s permanent collection, Mind, Mythos, Muse presents a case study of the designer’s methods and influences, and in doing so, provides the opportunity to better understand artistic legacy and cycles of inspiration.
Curators: Clarissa Esguerra, Costume and Textiles, LACMA; Michaela Hansen, Costume and Textiles, LACMA
Credit: The exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Support is provided by the 2021 Collectors Committee and The Jacqueline and Hoyt B. Leisure Costume and Textiles Fund.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Portable Universe / El Universo en Tus Manos: Thought and Splendor of Indigenous Colombia
May 29–October 2, 2022

Comprising approximately 400 works, including an unprecedented number of loans from the Museo del Oro in Bogota, this groundbreaking exhibition presents the diversity and materiality of ancient Colombian cultures and reframes how we approach ancient Colombian art. With the European conquest, Indigenous cultures and knowledge, based on millennia of intellectual efforts, were disregarded as crude superstition. Portable Universe is designed to recapture some of that knowledge and to envelop the works with life and meaning, inviting visitors into a cultural dialogue that spans both space and time. The project also draws heavily on contemporary Indigenous understandings to evoke a worldview in which ancient artworks have relevance for today and the future. The curatorial team has been working in close collaboration with the Arhuaco of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, who are supporting and engaged in the project, part of a longterm initiative in fostering cross-cultural dialogue and knowledge exchange.
Curator: Diana Magaloni, Art of the Ancient Americas, LACMA and Julia Burtenshaw, Art of the Ancient Americas, LACMA
Itinerary: Museum of Fine Arts Houston (November 6, 2022–April 16, 2023), Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (May 29– October 8, 2023)
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Museo del Oro of Banco de la República, Bogota.

The exhibition has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom.

Generous support is provided by Daniel Greenberg, Susan Steinhauser and The Greenberg Foundation. Support for LACMA’s Art of the Ancient Americas department is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Gregory Annenberg Weingarten, GRoW @ Annenberg.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800
June 12–October 30, 2022

Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800 represents the first comprehensive exhibition of LACMA’s notable holdings of Spanish American art—most assembled within the last 15 years. Following the arrival of the Spaniards in the Americas in the 15th century, the region developed complex artistic traditions that drew simultaneously on Indigenous, European, Asian, and African art. The Spanish conquest of the Philippines in 1565 inaugurated a new commercial route that connected Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Private homes and civic and ecclesiastic institutions in Spanish America were filled with imported and locally made objects. This confluence of riches signaled the status of the Americas as a major emporium—what one contemporaneous author described as “the archive of the world.” Featuring approximately 90 works, including several recent acquisitions, the exhibition emphasizes the creative power of Spanish America, including its central position as a global crossroads.
Curator: Ilona Katzew, Latin American Art, LACMA
Itinerary: Frist Art Museum (October 20, 2023–January 28, 2024)
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support is provided by the Carl & Marilynn Thoma Foundation.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Park Dae Sung: Virtuous Ink and Contemporary Brush
July 17–December 11, 2022

Park Dae Sung was born in 1945, during the waning days of Korea’s colonization by Japan. During the Korean War (1950–53), his parents were killed by Communist soldiers; since then, he found solace in painting. Self-taught, Park has spent time in China, walked the Silk Road, and searched for the meaning of hanja (Chinese characters), the aesthetic foundation of his calligraphy and paintings. Park Dae Sung: Virtuous Ink and Contemporary Brush spotlights the artist’s large ink paintings, all revealing variations of the line found in his calligraphy. With a single brush, he portrays contemporary subjects with calligraphic lines, effortlessly fusing the aesthetics of East and West. This intimate exhibition invites the viewer to see the brushstrokes in the composition up close. The only small painting in the exhibition is of a valued Joseon bowl, painted by brush in a hyperrealistic style, giving us a sense of Park’s wide range.
Curator: Virginia Moon, Korean Art, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

The organizers are grateful for the special support of Gana Art.

Exhibition supported in part by Samsung Foundation of Culture.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Objects of Desire: Photography and the Language of Advertising
September 4–December 18, 2022

Objects of Desire: Photography and the Language of Advertising traces the artistic manipulation of advertising, the most powerful, mainstream visual language. Since the 1970s, creative innovations led to dramatic shifts in the possibilities for photography as artistic expression, as photo-based artists reworked advertising strategies to challenge the increased commodification of daily life, and later to appropriate the command these images have over the viewer/consumer. By exploiting advertising’s visual vocabulary and adopting its sites and formats, and through re-photography, appropriation, and simulation, artists create a shared photographic language that puts the onus on the viewer to determine what exactly these pictures are asking of us. Participating artists include Adbusters, Lucas Blalock, Victor Burgin, Jo Ann Callis, Sarah Charlesworth, Sara Cwynar, Victoria Fu, Sanja Iveković, Elad Lassry, Roe Ethridge, Robert Heinecken, Barbara Kruger, Carter Mull, Pat O’Neil, Kim Schoen, Sandy Skoglund, Mitchell Syrop, and Hank Willis Thomas, among others.
Curator: Rebecca Morse, Photography, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support is provided by Contemporary Collectors Orange County.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

The Space Between: The Modern in Korean Art
September 11, 2022–February 19, 2023

A groundbreaking show that is the first of its kind in the West, The Space Between: The Modern in Korean Art covers the years 1897 to 1965, loosely organized chronologically, stylistically, and conceptually. The second of three major Korean art exhibitions of Hyundai Motor’s Korean Art Scholarship initiative, The Space Between spans the arc of European-influenced art via Japan in the Korean Empire (1897–1910) and colonial period (1910–45), explores American influences absorbed throughout the Korean War (1950–53), and provides a glimpse into the beginning of the contemporary. Featuring approximately 140 works that reflect the influx of foreign-introduced new media, including oils, photography, and sculpture, the exhibition is organized into five categories: “The Modern Encounter,” “The Modern Response,” “The Pageantry of Sinyeoseong (New Woman),” “The Modern Momentum,” and “Evolving into the Contemporary.”
Curator: Virginia Moon, Korean Art, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea.

Presented by Hyundai.

This exhibition is part of The Hyundai Project: Korean Art Scholarship Initiative at LACMA, a global exploration of traditional and contemporary Korean art through research, publications, and exhibitions.

Generous support is provided by the Korea Foundation.

Exhibition research and publication supported in part by Samsung Foundation of Culture.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Scandinavian Design and the United States, 1890–1980
October 9, 2022–February 5, 2023

Scandinavian Design and the United States, 1890–1980 is the first exhibition to examine the extensive design exchanges between the United States and the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) during the 20th century. Serving as a corrective to the dominant narrative of central European émigrés shaping modern American design culture, the exhibition will present a new international story, featuring accounts of Scandinavian designers who immigrated to the United States; Americans who studied or worked in Nordic countries; the ambitious campaigns to market and export Scandinavian design to American consumers; and the American and Nordic figures who championed sustainable and accessible design practice. Many of the issues considered in the exhibition remain relevant today, including the contributions of immigrants to their adopted societies, the importance of international exchange, critical analysis of cultural myths, and concern about environmental sustainability and accessibility.
Curators: Bobbye Tigerman, Decorative Arts and Design, LACMA; Monica Obniski, 20th- and 21st-Century Design, Milwaukee Art Museum
Itinerary: Stockholm Nationalmuseum (October 15, 2021–January 9, 2022); Nasjonalmuseet Oslo (March 17– August 7, 2022); Milwaukee Art Museum (March 24–July 23, 2023)
Credit: This exhibition is co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Milwaukee Art Museum.

The exhibition and international tour are made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation.

Generous support is provided by Nordic Culture Point. Additional support is provided by the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation and the Nordic Culture Fund. This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Sam Francis and Japan: Emptiness Overflowing
Spring 2023

In the work of American artist Sam Francis (1923–1994), Western and Eastern aesthetics engage in a profound intercultural dialogue. Francis first traveled to Japan in 1957, developing a lifelong affinity for Japanese art and culture that influenced his work. His expressive handling of negative space shared pictorial and philosophic affinities with aspects of East Asian aesthetics, particularly the Japanese concept of “ma,” the dynamic between form and non-form. With over 60 works from LACMA’s collection and key lenders, this is the first exhibition to explore the artist’s work in relation to “ma” and other aspects of Japanese aesthetics. It will include works by Francis in the company of historic Japanese works to illustrate stylistic priorities shared by both. Also on view are works of contemporary Japanese artists (many associated with Gutai and Mono-Ha) whom Francis knew from his extensive time in Japan in the 1960s and ’70s.
Curators: Hollis Goodall, Japanese Art, LACMA and Leslie Jones, Prints and Drawings, LACMA with Richard Speer
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in association with the Sam Francis Foundation.

Bank of America is the presenting sponsor of Sam Francis and Japan: Emptiness Overflowing.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

ON-VIEW

Carmen Herrera: Estructura Verde
October 9, 2021–February 13, 2022

Carmen Herrera’s Estructura Verde is based on a simple geometric conceit: a rectangular form is cleaved into two L-shaped components (one a perfect right angle, the other irregular) through the simple excision of three narrow, triangular cuts. Initially rendered as an isometric drawing in 1966, and appearing later as the basis for one of Herrera’s iconic Blanco y Verde paintings in 1966–67, the design was eventually realized in three dimensions in 1971 as a wall-mounted sculpture in wood. Estructura Verde, one of several Herrera sculptures fabricated in aluminum in 2018, represents the culmination of the artist’s translation of her 1966 drawing into three dimensions. Born in Cuba in 1915, Carmen Herrera lives in New York City. LACMA’s installation of Estructura Verde on the Smidt Welcome Plaza is the first presentation of her sculpture on the West Coast.
Curator: Jennifer King, Contemporary Art, LACMA
Credit: This installation was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support is provided by Lisson Gallery.

Ink Dreams: Selections from the Fondation INK Collection
September 19–December 12, 2021

Beyond the concrete materials of ink and paper, there is an intangible spirit uniting works of East Asian ink painting. But how does the spirit of ink translate to other mediums, global makers, and contemporary times? Comprising photography, sculpture, video and, of course, painting—Ink Dreams proposes a new view of ink art for the contemporary era, one that incorporates qualities from the ink painting tradition and new adaptations of traditional subject matter, unbounded by traditional materials. Ink Dreams is the first presentation of work from the Fondation INK Collection, a 400-piece collection of contemporary art in the spirit of ink that was promised to LACMA in 2018. The exhibition examines the impact of ink on the global contemporary art world, and features works by artists from Asia, Europe, and North America, including Chen Haiyan, Shirazeh Houshiary, Lin Tianmiao, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Xu Bing, Yang Jiechang, and others
Curator: Susanna Ferrell, Chinese Art, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the Fondation INK.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography, 1870–1900
August 8–November 7, 2021

Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography, 1870–1900 offers the first-ever in-depth examination of cabinet cards. Inexpensive and sold by the dozen, cabinet cards were America’s main format for photographic portraiture through the last three decades of the nineteenth century, just prior to the introduction of the snapshot camera. Earlier, getting a photographic portrait was a formal, rare event; the new format made it commonplace. This exhibition reveals how professional photographers and their sitters across the United States introduced immediacy to studio portraiture, transforming their sessions into avenues of fun and personal expression. Sections will trace the cabinet card’s evolution, from its beginnings in celebrity culture, through the marketing and advertising strategies of practitioners, to the diverse behaviors that people brought to their sittings. With Americans embracing photography as a fact of everyday life and playing with the medium’s believability, cabinet cards made photography modern.
Curator: Britt Salvesen, Photography and Prints and Drawings, LACMA
Itinerary: Amon Carter Museum of American Art (August 15–November 1, 2020)
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Legacies of Exchange: Chinese Contemporary Art from the Yuz Foundation
July 4, 2021–March 13, 2022

Featuring Ai Weiwei, Huang Yong Ping, Wang Guangyi, Xu Bing, and more, Legacies of Exchange: Chinese Contemporary Art from the Yuz Foundation brings together works of Chinese contemporary art created in response to international trade, political conflict, and global artistic exchange. Pulled from the Yuz Museum’s esteemed collection of contemporary art, Legacies of Exchange spotlights encounters, exchanges, and collisions between China and the West. This exhibition is part of LACMA’s ongoing partnership with the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, China, a joint effort to create collaborative exhibitions and to provide both museums with greater access to a more diverse collection of artworks.
Curator: Susanna Ferrell, Chinese Art, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Presented by East West Bank.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Modern Art Collection
June 13, 2021–Ongoing

LACMA’s Modern art collection, which primarily features European and American art from 1900 to the 1960s, returns to public view with examples of work from the museum’s American, Decorative Arts and Design, and Latin American art holdings. As in the past, several galleries are dedicated to the Janice and Henri Lazarof Collection—including concentrations of work by Pablo Picasso and Alberto Giacometti—and others are devoted to the museum’s renowned German Expressionist holdings of paintings, sculpture, and works on paper. The installation presents Michael McMillen’s immersive environment Central Meridian (The Garage) (1981), and recent acquisitions by Josef Albers, Judy Chicago, Theo van Doesburg, Maren Hassinger, Jacob Lawrence, Anne Truitt, and others are displayed for the first time. The Modern art galleries have been redesigned in collaboration with Gehry Partners, LLP, and include new interpretive texts, a series of thematic audio tours, and an installation soundtrack.
Curator: Stephanie Barron, Modern Art, LACMA

Yoshitomo Nara
April 1, 2021–January 2, 2022

Yoshitomo Nara is among the most beloved Japanese artists of his generation. His widely recognizable portraits of menacing figures reflect the artist’s raw encounters with his inner self. A peripatetic traveler, Nara’s oeuvre takes inspiration from a wide range of resources— memories of his childhood, music, literature, studying and living in Germany (1988– 2000), exploring his roots in Japan, Sakhalin, and Asia, and modern art from Europe and Japan. Spanning over 30 years from 1987 to 2020, Yoshitomo Nara views the artist’s work through the lens of his longtime passion—music. Featuring album covers Nara began collecting as an adolescent, paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics, an installation that recreates his drawing studio, and never-before-exhibited idea sketches that reflect the artist’s empathic eye, this exhibition shines a light on Nara’s conceptual process. One of the main highlights will be Miss Forest, a 26-foot outdoor painted bronze sculpture that will grace Wilshire Boulevard.
Curator: Mika Yoshitake, Guest curator
Itinerary: Yuz Museum, Shanghai (March 4–September 4, 2022)
Credit: This exhibition is organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Principal sponsorship is provided by United Airlines.

Major support is provided by Mr. Zoltan and Mrs. Tamara Varga, London; Andrew Xue, Singapore; Blum & Poe; and Pace Gallery.

Generous support is provided by Rochelle and Irving Azoff, Andre Sakhai, Sally and Ralph Tawil, and Japan Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Cauleen Smith: Give It or Leave It
April 1–October 31, 2021

Cauleen Smith is a Los Angeles-based interdisciplinary artist whose work reflects upon the everyday possibilities of the imagination. Smith roots her work firmly within the discourse of mid-20th-century experimental film. A traveling solo exhibition of film, video, and installation, Give It or Leave It features a series of experimental portraits of different sites related to spirituality, creativity, and utopianism. Much of the research conducted for Smith’s film projects has taken place in California, on location at Alice Coltrane’s ashram, The Vedantic Center, and in history through a restaging of a photograph of nine dapper black men taken in 1966 at the Watts Towers by Bill Ray. Additional archival research delves into the 19th-century black spiritualist Rebecca Cox Jackson, who was the Eldress of the first black Shaker community in Philadelphia. These separate and unrelated universes coalesce into an emotional cosmos in Give It or Leave It.
Curator: Rita Gonzalez, Contemporary, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania.

Support is provided by the Pasadena Art Alliance.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

LACMA: ON THE ROAD

Light, Space, Surface: Works from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Venues: Addison Gallery of American Art, MA (November 23, 2021–March 20, 2022); The Frist Art Museum, TN (June 3–September 4, 2022) Light, Space, Surface: Works from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art explores the art of Light and Space as well as related works with highly polished surfaces often referred to as “finish fetish.” In the 1960s and 1970s, various Southern California artists began to create works that investigate perceptual phenomena: how we come to understand form, volume, presence, and absence through light, seen directly through other materials, reflected, or refracted. Many used newly developed industrial materials— including sheet acrylic, fiberglass, and polyester resin—in their work. Light, Space, Surface draws on LACMA’s deep holdings of this material, revealing the vibrancy and diversity of this aspect of American art history. Featured artists include Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Judy Chicago, Mary Corse, Fred Eversley, Robert Irwin, John McCracken, James Turrell, and Doug Wheeler, among others.
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Generous support is provided by the Carl & Marilynn Thoma Foundation.

Golden Hour: California Photography from LACMA. Venues: Lancaster Museum of Art and History (February 7–May 9, 2021); Riverside Art Museum (June 5–September 26, 2021); Vincent Price Art Museum (October 16, 2021– February 5, 2022); California State University Northridge (February 19–April 30, 2022) In Golden Hour, over 70 artists and three photography collectives offer an aesthetic approach to understanding the complexities and histories of California. These images, gathered from the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, have come to define the myths, iconographies, and realities of this unique state. Pairing masters of photography with experimental practitioners in a range of lens-based media that includes photo sculpture, vernacular, and video work, the selection blurs the boundaries of the tropes that formed a California identity. With works ranging from the early 1900s to present day, Golden Hour is neither a didactic history of the state nor an inclusive tale of photographic history, but rather artists’ impressions of the state of being in, and being influenced by, California.
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in collaboration with the Lancaster Museum of Art and History; Riverside Art Museum; Vincent Price Art Museum at East Los Angeles College; and California State University, Northridge, Art Galleries.

Local Access is a series of American art exhibitions created through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by LACMA as part of the Art Bridges Initiative.

Julie Mehretu. Venues: High Museum of Art, Atlanta (October 24, 2020–January 31, 2021); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (March 19–August 8, 2021); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN (October 16, 2021–March 6, 2022) Co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and The Whitney Museum of American Art, Julie Mehretu is a mid-career survey that will unite 35 paintings with nearly 40 works on paper dating from 1996 to the present by Julie Mehretu (b. 1970, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia). The first-ever comprehensive retrospective of Mehretu’s career, it covers over two decades of her examination of history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, war, global uprising, diaspora, and displacement through the artistic strategies of abstraction, architecture, landscape, movement, and, most recently, figuration. Mehretu’s play with scale, as evident in her intimate drawings and large canvases and complex techniques in printmaking, will be explored in depth. Mehretu received her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, and among many awards and honors is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” (2005) and a U.S. State Department National Medal of Arts (2015).
Curators: Christine Y. Kim, Contemporary Art, LACMA with Rujeko Hockley, Whitney Museum of American Art
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Major support is provided by Ford Foundation.

This exhibition is sponsored by Max Mara and Phillips.

Generous support is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, carlier | gebauer, Marian Goodman Gallery, and White Cube. Additional support is provided by Visionary Women.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

Betye Saar: Call and Response. Venues: Morgan Library & Museum, New York (September 12, 2020–January 31, 2021); Mississippi Museum of Art (April 10–July 11, 2021); Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX (September 25, 2021–January 2, 2022) Betye Saar: Call and Response looks at the relationship between preliminary sketches in small notebooks, which Saar has made throughout her career, and finished works. In addition, the show will include approximately a dozen small travel sketchbooks with more finished drawings—relating to leitmotifs seen throughout Saar’s oeuvre—that she has made over a lifetime of journeys worldwide. Saar (b. 1926, Los Angeles) is one of the most talented artists of her generation. She is not as well known as her talents deserve, however, no doubt largely because she is a black woman who came of age in the 1960s outside of New York City. Her work consistently addresses issues of race, gender, and spirituality. Very much a part of the strong assemblage tradition of Southern California, Saar’s work combines many different symbols along with objects found on her travels across Africa, Mexico, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean, as well as in L.A. itself. Betye Saar: Call and Response will cover the span of Saar’s career, including work from her early years up through a new sculptural installation. A fully illustrated publication will accompany the exhibition, taking physical form in response to Saar’s notebooks. This will be the first exhibition at a California museum to address her entire career and the first anywhere to focus on her sketchbooks.
Curator: Carol S. Eliel, Modern Art, LACMA
Credit: This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

This exhibition is made possible in part by The Claire Falkenstein Foundation, the Pasadena Art Alliance, Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte, and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles.

All exhibitions at LACMA are underwritten by the LACMA Exhibition Fund. Major annual support is provided by Meredith and David Kaplan, with generous annual funding from Kevin J. Chen, Louise and Brad Edgerton, Edgerton Foundation, Emily and Teddy Greenspan, Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross, Mary and Daniel James, Jennifer and Mark McCormick, Kelsey Lee Offield, Lenore and Richard Wayne, and Marietta Wu and Thomas Yamamoto.

About LACMA
Located on the Pacific Rim, LACMA is the largest art museum in the western United States, with a collection of more than 147,000 objects that illuminate 6,000 years of artistic expression across the globe. Committed to showcasing a multitude of art histories, LACMA exhibits and interprets works of art from new and unexpected points of view that are informed by the region’s rich cultural heritage and diverse population. LACMA’s spirit of experimentation is reflected in its work with artists, technologists, and thought leaders as well as in its regional, national, and global partnerships to share collections and programs, create pioneering initiatives, and engage new audiences.

Location: 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90036 | 323 857-6000