Widline Cadet. Jiskaske Enfinite Vini Nan Yon Fen (Until Infinity Comes To An End). 2021. Archival Inkjet Print, Artist Frame, 32 x 40 in. Courtesy the artist 

(Never) as I Was Includes Work by Widline Cadet, Texas Isaiah, Genesis Jerez, and Jacolby Satterwhite

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s annual Artist-in-Residence exhibition will be on view at MoMA PS1 from November 18, 2021 to February 27, 2022. Part of an ongoing collaboration between the Studio Museum, The Museum of Modern Art and PS1, (Never) as I Was: Studio Museum Artists in Residence 2020–21 will feature new work by the 2020–21 cohort of the Studio Museum’s foundational residency program, artists Widline Cadet (b. 1992, Pétion-Ville, Haiti), Texas Isaiah (b. Brooklyn, NY), Genesis Jerez (b. 1993, Bronx, NY) and Jacolby Satterwhite (b. 1986, Columbia, SC). In response to the seismic impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, for the first time in the Studio Museum’s history the artists participated entirely in remote form for the duration of the residency.

With practices spanning new media, painting, sculpture, and photography these artists propose dynamic ways of experiencing time, space, and locality set into this current moment of complex transformation. Widline Cadet’s photo and video work examines intergenerational memory, selfhood, and erasure within the diasporic experience. Texas Isaiah offers a space for mourning, celebration, prayer, and remembrance, asserting the significance of imagination in the abolition of gender while exploring the healing capacity of rest as a place of connection. Genesis Jerez’s collaged paintings layer family photographs, oil paint, and charcoal to create works that interrogate her own personal histories and reckon with questions of diasporic fracture. Jacolby Satterwhite’s multidimensional installation sees the artist’s return to painting, engaging fantasy and surrealism as a coping mechanism for healing and flaying open an existential psychic space for imagining transcendent futures. With communication deeply mediated by the digital, each artist took on the challenge of recharting the territories of domestic, social, and studio space. The outcomes are tender and lyrical explorations of family histories, memoir, spirituality, and memory.

(Never) As I Was is organized by Legacy Russell, former Associate Curator, Exhibitions, The Studio Museum in Harlem (now Executive Director & Chief Curator, The Kitchen), with Yelena Keller, Curatorial Assistant, Exhibitions, The Studio Museum in Harlem, and Jody Graf, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1. Exhibition research is provided by Angelique Rosales Salgado, former The Studio Museum in Harlem and MoMA Curatorial Fellow, and Elana Bridges, former Mellon Curatorial Fellow, The Studio Museum in Harlem.

SPONSORSHIP
Support for (Never) as I Was at MoMA PS1 is generously provided by the Tom Slaughter Exhibition Fund and the MoMA PS1 Trustee Annual Fund.

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Artist-in-Residence program is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts; New York State Council on the Arts; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Jerome Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; and by endowments established by the Andrea Frank Foundation, the Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Trust, and Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Additional support is generously provided by The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

ABOUT THE ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
The Studio Museum’s iconic Artist-in-Residence program gives emerging (and now mid-career) artists of African and Afro-Latinx descent an unparalleled opportunity to develop their practice in an eleven-month residency, and offers audiences the chance to view this work in annual exhibitions. Alumni of the program, who now number nearly 150, include some of today’s most significant and innovative artists, including Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Jordan Casteel, David Hammons, Lauren Halsey, Titus Kaphar, Simone Leigh, Kerry James Marshall, Julie Mehretu, Wangechi Mutu, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley.

The artists in residence for 2021–22 are Cameron Granger, Jacob Mason-Macklin, and Qualeasha Wood.

ABOUT THE STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM
Founded in 1968 by a diverse group of artists, community activists, and philanthropists, The Studio Museum in Harlem is internationally known for its catalytic role in promoting the work of artists of African descent. The Studio Museum is preparing to construct a new home at its longtime location on Manhattan’s West 125th Street, designed by Adjaye Associates in collaboration with Cooper Robertson. The building—the first created expressly for the institution’s program—will enable the Studio Museum to better serve a growing and diverse audience, provide additional educational opportunities for people of all ages, expand its program of world-renowned exhibitions, effectively display its singular collection, and strengthen its trailblazing Artist-in Residence program.

While currently closed for construction, the Studio Museum is working to deepen its roots in its neighborhood through inHarlem, a dynamic set of collaborative initiatives. The Museum’s groundbreaking exhibitions, thought-provoking conversations, and engaging art-making workshops continue at a variety of partner and satellite locations in Harlem and beyond. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

Find us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube: @studiomuseum

ABOUT MoMA PS1
MoMA PS1 champions art and artists at the intersection of the social, cultural, and political issues of our time. Providing audiences with the agency to ask questions, access to knowledge, and a forum for public debate, PS1 has offered insight into artists’ diverse worldviews for more than 40 years. Founded in 1976 by Alanna Heiss, the institution was a defining force in the alternative space movement in New York City, transforming a nineteenth century public schoolhouse in Long Island City into a site for artistic experimentation and creativity. PS1 has been a member of New York City’s Cultural Institutions Group (CIG) since 1982 and affiliated with The Museum of Modern Art since 2000.

Hours: MoMA PS1 is open from 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Thursday through Monday, and until 8 p.m. on Saturdays. Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

Admission: $10 suggested admission; $5 for students and senior citizens; free for New York City residents and MoMA members. Free admission for NYC residents is made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

Visitor Guide: Discover even more from PS1 and the Studio Museum with the Bloomberg Connects app. Read wall text, hear directly from artists, and uncover the building’s history with this multimedia visitor guide. This digital experience is made possible through the support of Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Directions: MoMA PS1 is located at 22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Ave in Long Island City, Queens, across the Queensboro Bridge from midtown Manhattan. Traveling by subway, take the E, M, or 7 to Court Sq; or the G to Court Sq or 21 St Van Alst. By bus, take the Q67 to Jackson and 46th Ave or the B62 to 46th Ave.

Information: For general inquiries, call (718) 784-2084 or visit moma.org/ps1.